9months and beyond and the Project Prenatal Education in the Schools


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The prenatal experience


THE MOST IMPORTANT NINE MONTHS
OF OUR LIFE
edited by the Association "9months and Beyond"





"If a child
during the nine months of his life in the womb
was desired
because he had been conceived responsibly
during pregnancy has received acceptance and joy of motherhood ...
because he was desired
has been heard ...
because his parents knew he was capable of communicating,
felt understood ...
because he has been heard,
was cared for ...
because he was desired, accepted, heard, understood and pampered,
This child that was always listened to,
will be born and grow up believing that he is worthy,
will respect and love himself,
because he has always been respected and loved
since the dawn of his existence
when for the first time he appeared in life
in his mother's womb"

Excerpt from "Communication and dialogue during the 9 months" by Gabriella A. Ferrari.



In recent decades, studies on prenatal life have multiplied exceedingly. Between the years 1980 and 2000, t hey have been gradually shaped, the portrait of a fetus emerging from these new and wonderful discoveries.
Now, we can no longer ignore that the intrauterine baby is sensitive and intelligent, whose psycho-physical characteristics are inscribed only in part within its genetic heritage from conception.

For example, approximately one-third of a baby’s intelligence is due to its genetic make-up, and two-thirds is attributed to external stimuli and environmental experiences.
That the fetus is intelligent and sensitive is now a fact confirmed by numerous and varied research performed on its learning and responses to stimuli and situations. For example, you can see a clear intentional gesture already in an embryo of 8 weeks.
The sense organs and corresponding brain centers are already formed by the end of the embryonic period. Hearing is the sense organ that is most responsive in the uterus, thus allowing the fetus to relate to the outside world. Its development is complete towards the end of the 5th month of gestation, but the child is already able to recognize, for example, the father's voice from the 16th to 17th week, as demonstrated during the ultrasound examinations by his behavior and acceleration of heart rate when he hears his father’s voice amongst the various others that are present.

Dr. Clements has studied the response of fetuses to various types of music. She has found that Beethoven and Brahms agitate them, Mozart and Vivaldi calms them. Rock music, with its bass and pounding, is unwelcome to the fetus. Instead the child likes to hear the voice of his mother, especially when she sings: there are many experiences of recognition by the newborn, of melodies or songs heard in the womb.
In the '80s, 90s and 2000, physicians, psychologists, midwives, biophysicists, social scientists, scholars and researchers from around the world, began to present the results of their research and experiences.
What clearly emerged as the model experiences in the womb, after birth, were the child's behavior towards himself, his relationship with his mother and father, as well as his attitude towards life in general.

Canadian psychiatrist Thomas Verny, author of "The Secret Life of the unborn child" (Ed. Mondadori), reports that: "What happens after birth is an elaboration of what has happened before, and on this it depends".

The fetus is a tiny human being, capable of feelings and emotions, hearing, tasting, consistently responding to stimuli and interaction with its parents. It is also able to memorise and therefore has a cognitive and learning capacity: the fetus moves his arms, frowns, rolls his eyes under his eyelids showing curiosity to stimuli, but later, when it receives a number of stimuli known to him, generally between 3 and 4, it no longer responds, or calms down or falls asleep, proving to have not only stored, recognized, and then learned the stimulus, but also be able to respond consistently. The fetus suffers and rejoices. The expression of crying was recorded during the 21st week. In addition, the intrauterine child is sociable, communicative and is able to establish long-lasting emotional relationships.

Dr. Alessandra Piontelli of Milan has performed some very interesting ultrasound studies on twins from the 20th week. She observed their behavior for several hours a day, and has reported some truly fascinating episodes. Among the many highlights is a particularly amusing and also very significant one. The twins, Luca and Alice had established a loving and playful relationship in utero: Luca, the more lively of the two, went to the membrane that separates him from his sister and woke her up gently. An incredible game-dialogue took place between the two who took to rubbing their heads and contacting each other through the membrane, leaning cheek to cheek, as if embracing. This action was then taken up by Luca and Alice at the end of their first year of life. They went into a tent, which symbolized a membrane, and repeated the loving gesture that had characterized their relationship in utero, thereby demonstrating that it is possible to sustain this loving relationship over time.

The results of these studies and research report that the emotions of the mother can be communicated to the unborn child via empathy but also through hormones and the heartbeat, after the first weeks of life: if the latter, for example, has been accelerated by a strong emotion, her child's heart will also start beating faster than before. The child experiences changes in heartbeat, demonstrations of joy, sadness, denial, an expressive facial expression and gesture not only as a coherent reaction to everything that the mother expresses, but also to changes in the immediate environment.

In addition to showing that they have musical preferences, it is also possible to find out how the child demonstrated his like or dislike to certain family members by mimicking the same likes and dislikes as the mother. He also does not like environmental contexts that offer unpleasant and sudden noises. In response to stimuli, and according to their liking, the fetus smiles, winks with his eyes, yawns, or kicks, makes faces, or decides to ignore the urge to fall asleep or turn away.

Anxiety and maternal stress induced changes in hormonal production will flood the bloodstream, making the child nervous and excited, inducing him also into a state of stress.
On the other hand, the joyful emotions of the mother also reach the fetus: a beneficial and revitalizing flow of endorphins are sent to the fetus every time the mother is happy or in love.

Following his research on unwanted children, Prof. P. Fedor Freyberg from Uppsala University, physician and researcher on prenatal, puts it this way: "Unwanted children are morally at risk and pose a moral threat to society. The ideal child should be loved even before birth. There should be no unwanted children ".

CONCLUSION: All studies and research suggest that a child needs to be wanted, accepted and loved from its first few weeks of intrauterine life, not only by the mother but by both parents together.They must also talk to the fetus frequently and lovingly, especially from the 4th and 5th months, stroking and caressing him, making him feel part of the family and not "waiting to participate."


AT A TIME
WHEN WE ARE VERY CONCERNED
WITH HUMAN RIGHTS AND CHILDREN,
DOES IT NOT SEEM LOGICAL TO THINK THAT
IF THE FIRST RIGHT OF A HUMAN BEING
IS TO BE LOVED AND WANTED?
SHOULD NOT THOSE
WILL BRING ABOUT ABOUT
CONCEPTION,
PREGNANCY
AND BIRTH
BE CAPABLE OF OFFERING HIM,
FROM THE BEGINNING OF HIS JOURNEY,
THE BEST AND MOST FAVORABLE CONDITIONS
FOR HIS GROWTH?





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